Rabies

Feline Rabies is an incurable disease which affects the central nervous system of almost all mammals, including humans. Vaccinating against rabies is highly recommended if your cat will spend any time outside. It is spread through saliva, and is most often contracted through the bite of an infected animal such as a skunk, raccoon, bat, fox, coyote, or weasel. There is a low risk for contracting rabies from rodents or rabbits, and no risk from reptiles, birds or insects. Vaccination against rabies will give your cat a much greater resistance to rabies if it is exposed.

Feline Distemper Combination (FVRCP+C)

This single vaccination protects your cat against a group of diseases which includes FelineViral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Panleukopenia. The initial vaccination requires a 30-day booster followed by a booster annually.

  • Feline Panleukopenia is also known as Feline Distemper. Treatment is very difficult and the disease is often fatal. This disease is so resistant that it can survive up to one year outside of the cat’s body. Because of this, most cats will become exposed to it at some time in their life. If an unprotected cat is exposed, the risk of infection is 90-100%. If a cat recovers, it can continue to spread the disease to other unprotected cats. Symptoms include lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, severe dehydration and fever. The good news is that the vaccine is very effective in preventing the disease.

  • Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis is similar to the human common cold. This virus causes an upper respiratory tract infection with symptoms such as moderate fever, loss of appetite, sneezing, eye and nasal discharge, and coughing. It is easily transmitted from one cat to another. This disease can be dangerous in any unprotected cat, especially kittens. A recovered cat can continue to infect other animals, as well as experience chronic sneezing and runny eyes.

  • Feline Calicivirus is a viral infection and another major cause of upper respiratory tract infection. It is widespread, highly contagious, and difficult to treat. There are multiple forms of the calicivirus and the disease can range from mild to severe depending on the strain of virus present. Symptoms can include fever, ulcers and blisters on the tongue, pneumonia, and severe limping.

Feline Leukemia (for outdoor cats)

This vaccination helps to protect your cat against Feline Leukemia (FeLV). After initial exposure, a cat may show no symptoms for months, even years, while continuing to infect other cats. Once the cat shows symptoms of infection, mortality rates are 100%. Health problems can include cancerous conditions such as leukemia to a wide range of secondary infections caused by the destruction of its immune response system. Testing is available to determine the FeLV status of your cat, and if it has not been exposed, vaccination against this disease is recommended if your cat roams outside and may have contact with other outdoor cats.